Recycled Bikes?

| April 1, 2009

I was watching one of the Green TV channels the other day (don’t remember the actual channel name because I so infrequently get to watch), but the host of the show gave me a great idea, recycled bikes.

For the Non Bike Rider

How many times have you gotten a great idea to get in shape, run out purchase a gym membership, order the Total Fitness Gym from TV or the latest get in shape video/DVD only to fizzle out and realize that you spent a ton of money for nothing? C’mon, you know you’ve done it once or twice or more in your life.

Well, the idea of a recycled bike sounded great. Currently I don’t have a bike, and my old ‘spend and waste’ personality would have gone to a bike store and allowed the salesperson to convince me that I needed the latest, best most expensive bike loaded with a ton of useless gadgets. After purchasing such a bike, with all of the intentions of riding it regularly, I would ride the bike once or twice and it would sit in the garage, or my kids would ride and ruin it.

Recycled  Bike

A much more economical approach is to find a second hand bike, and fix it up. Not only is it more cost effective, it’s recycling at its best. You just have to know what to look for in a used bike. After all, brakes can always be repaired, tires replaced and gear chains replaced and oiled. A bent or broken bike frame is another story.

For folks like me looking to get back into the swing of biking, I think a used bike is a great place to begin. However, once I get to Lance Armstrong’s level, then I’ll contemplate getting a new bike.Bike

While searching the internet, I came across these interesting sites involving bike recycling. If any of the recyclers are located near you, it might be worth checking them out:

Local Motion in Vermont
Recycle a Bike in Providence Rhode Island
Recycle a Bicycle in New York City
Recycled Cycles in Colorado

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Category: Recycling, Saving Money

About the Author ()

Felicia is a bit of a tree hugger and likes to share ways to lighten the toxic burden on the environment.

Comments (2)

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  1. Nicole says:

    It is so great to see this post! Last year I wanted to buy a new bike with the bday money I received. But I didn’t really like the thought of spending all that money and like you said, probably not ride it more than a few times. But in the pole barn of the house we bought the year before the old owners left a couple of bikes. One was an older cruising type that they are selling now, all rusted and not very pleasing to the eye. But I got out the brillo pads, rubber gloves, chrome polish and lots of elbow grease. With some new tubes and tires my “old” bike became my “new” bike. I have so much pride in that bike, the way it shines now, all that rust came off! Who would have knew! I know that I would not have had that same attitude towards a store bought bike. Even a year later I still smile at my bike when I pass it (did you notice I didn’t say ride 🙂 )in my garage. I think that it is very worth it to make over a new bike! Great post and great site. I came here to find liquid hand soap recipes and left with a subscription. I am always looking for new ways to be green!

    • Felicia says:

      Nicole, I love what you did with that ‘old’ bike.

      Now the second part of the story is how much fun you’re having riding it (hint, hint). 😀